Engineering Education, Engineers, and Discussions


Guess I need to really get a life. Most – and here, I mean most – of the people I know happen to be engineers. Yeah, I mean the BE/B.Tech sort.

I know very few folks doing commerce and related courses. A couple of them doing pure sciences. And very, very few in Arts. And just, just ONE person pursuing fine arts. And anyway, these aren’t people I interact with on a daily basis – just old friends who I get together with once in a blue moon in the name of a reunion.

Around where I live – no, not my hostel, which is obviously full of engineering students – surrounded by software folks, and those who aren’t SEs are mechies. At home… my parents aren’t engineering graduates, but thanks to their jobs, most of their friends turn out to be engineers. Or at worst, architects.

The obvious fallout of all this is that my interaction with non-engineers is minimal. It reflects in conversation – we can convince you Halloween and Christmas are the same ‘coz oct31=dec25. We understand the universe and God in terms of operating systems. When someone switched from deathVocals to demureVoice, we said we were ‘amazed by the context-switch time’. The level of discomfort on a sleeper bus to Bangalore has to do with the passenger’s inertia. We try to analyze the ‘railway ticket booking and allotment algorithm’ while waiting in queues. And queues are where we crib about people not optimizing using queuing theory. It is not uncommon to hear of Rayleigh scattering being spoken of in context of us enjoying the sunset on the beach. And we are also the sort who commit very less to memory, for everything is available on the Net – it is commonplace to have a conversation like “Bridget Jones… what’s that guy’s name….” *wiki for ‘Bridget Jones film’* aha! Colin Firth… ” – so much that our idea of the ultimate terrorist attack would be to bomb the Google servers.

It’s reflected even on my blogroll – Of around 40 links, I have one economist pair, one espionage agent (but then, he established NTFO…) , one radio jockey (who I guess graduated in commerce), a whole bunch of linguists. – they teach computational linguistics, so guess they can come under ‘engineer’? – , one doc, and one lawyer…. and everyone else is an engineer.

When I first started blogging, I’d written a post mentioning an umbrella and its octagonal shape. The first feedback on that came from Karthik who analyzed why octagon is the most optimal shape for an umbrella. And on his and other IITian blogs, I’ve come across gems like “May the m.dv/dt be with you”, and “On this day of Nov 18, may you be curiosity personified” and kill the CAT. Urban legend goes that an unsuspecting non-engineer once asked an IITM student how to get to Marina from the campus, and was told to catch m buses first to reach <arbit destination in Chennai I can’t recollect> and then n buses from there to reach Santhome – and this hapless non-engineer patiently waited for a bus of the m-series to turn up.

Getting to the point, I find that most of my favorite blogs and op-eds are written by engineers. No, these aren’t just techie blogs about Data Mining, Information Retrieval or the latest advances in Toxicology or Pharmacology, but also about current affairs, religion, movies, food and humour.

I’m not saying engineers make the best writers – there are people like Chetan Bhagat and Sidin Vadukut – or even that non-engineers do – there are bloggers like Silverine and Rashmi Bansal, too. I’m not even saying the best bloggers are engineers – our very own Monkey Man is a notable exception.

Just that when I like a piece of writing, the probability that it was written by an engineer is very high. And vice versa, too.

I wonder why…. It could possibly be because:

  • The number of engineers who have blogs are indiscriminately high compared to other professions. So by sheer numbers, engineers win. This might be because
    • Engineers use computers and the Net more consistently and regularly than others, and so tend to have more Net-related hobbies
    • Engineers are more jobless and blog more often.
    • Others have other outlets of expressing themselves – more notably the electronic and print media, where being rational is a cardinal sin.
  • I’m a frogInAWell; been with engineers and only engineers for too long, and hence appreciate only this way of thinking
  • Engineers write well, reason well, organize their arguments well, and are more logical and convincing when compared to other professionals which could be because of
    • Engineering education
    • People who are good at stuff like this to start with all go into engineering

I used to be all for Mr. Shashi Tharoor a couple of years back. Not anymore.. I find his generalizations too broad and the foundations for his premises extremely faulty, apart from finding his conclusions and line of reasoning too prejudiced towards being politically correct – but then, he’s a BA in History.

Reading Arundati Roy – I don’t think she gained anything from her stint at the School of Planning and Architecture, other than a husband – gave me an insight into what I essentially find wrong with non-engineers and their writing – passion, command over language, verbosity and rhetoric is no substitute for substance, and any engineer can spot bilge when (s)he sees it, having put enough in answer papers and presentations. And the two engineering exceptions I mentioned before – they survive because of the inability of the rest to tell the difference between bilge and real hi-fi writing, and they know it

The USP of engineers is that apart from being very diverse, we can have a perspective on engineering issues as well as other issues, whereas others can’t quite, with the possible exception of economists (freakonomists?). And that’s what irks the rest.

Other professionals, like doctors and economists have always had a say in issues like development. As for other folks like historians and littérateurs, you folks can almost never prevent your own prejudices from seeping into your work and making a dog’s breakfast of it (and whattodo, your job is but like that) – but the world doesn’t quite realize that. And you journalists, the breed I used to want to belong to once upon a time, I’ve lost all respect for you lot in the past few years, and also in the past couple of weeks when I’ve seen press coverage of my college’s techfest become an op-ed with snatches of random informal conversation thrown in for good measure – Mr. Reporter, you never did get the whole spirit of Engineer, or engineers, did you?

For too long, engineers have been branded socially inept, verbally and grammatically challenged, ignorant of art, dispassionate, unfeeling and a host of other things that have made sure our point of view isn’t taken seriously. Hopefully, that’s undergoing change, aided by Blogosphere.

And also examples like Sujatha, Dr. Abdul Kalam, culfests of the IITs and NITs, Brian May, Jorge Cham, Randall Munroe, Nagesh Kukunoor, Rajeev Srinivasan, Shankar Mahadevan, Anil Kumble….. and maybe the engineers on my blogroll.

PS: For Spunky Monkey and those who read his blog – This is not a counter-post to his rant on medicine where he abuses engineers, and it’s not a continuation of my passionate comment on that post. Just something I’d been meaning to write since a long while.

PPS: Nothing to do with the post or why I wrote it, but there are some times in life when Ella Fitzgerald seems to have envisaged all that you’ll ever feel and wrote songs for the whole gamut of emotions you go through. This is one of those. And no, Lady Ella was not an engineer… she was a highschool dropout. But then, she was born and raised in a pragmatic, sensible, open-minded world, not one like ours where our thinking is defined and limited by the media, textbooks, and other symbols of modern mass-communication.

About wanderlust

just your average books-and-music person who wants to change the world.
This entry was posted in analysis, Priya's Travails, Rants. Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Engineering Education, Engineers, and Discussions

  1. Logik says:

    Ha. Ha. I sure hope Mr.Reporter reads that.

    Regarding Engineers convincing people of their views,extend it further. IIM grads do a better job at it. Since they’re “filtered” engineers anyways, its not surprising.

    And to bilge/rubbish, I guess those are their literary ornamentations, and if you’d ask good writers to stifle their linguistic prowess, just to showcase their content in an organized manner, it might lead to juiceless oeuvres such as engineering blogs.

    See, we’re capable of bilge, courtesy wordweb, and that 2 month long greprep.

    And Yay for calling Bhagat lousy. That call center c-rap was utterly hopeless.

  2. rand0mwalker says:

    People who are good at stuff like this to start with all go into engineering

    This would be my reason #1.

  3. wanderlust says:

    @logik:
    iim grads… filtered engineers hits the nail on the head.
    im not talking about ornamentations. ornamentation makes reading more lively. the problem begins when it begins to substitute for substance. Like Ms. Roy has this poetic, rhetorical way of writing. the only problem is that she simply throws words with no logic behind them. like “They’re mostly rich folk who live in our poor country like captive animals, incarcerated by their own wealth, locked and barred in their gilded cages, protecting themselves from the threat of the vulgar and unruly multitudes whom they have systematically dispossessed over the centuries.?

    like someone said about her, “her conclusions are far more obvious than her arguments and that makes it impossible to function. You don’t know where to begin or where to end.”

    I actually think the GRE prep vocab expansion was a positive influence – people started using more diverse words while speaking. such a welcome relief from calling all good things “cool”, “awesome”, “brilliant”, “godawesome” and variants thereof, or using words like “sucks!” to convey all possible degrees of negativity. i wouldn’t call that bilge. All Words No Meaning is bilge.

    forget call center… even five point someone was nonsense. and journalists heralded it as the English, August of the modern day. That’s like calling Pol Pot the Gandhi or Mandela of Cambodia.

    @rand0mwalker:
    same here, but it would be closely followed by “engineering education”. The concepts are so generic that you can apply them anywhere. your thinking is more structured, and your ability to recognize the main issues and why they are happening is sharpened. you are _used to_ thinking this way.

  4. Malaveeka says:

    Bleh.

  5. Siri says:

    Yea, a lot of talented people end up in engineering and then get owned by the system making them look like clowns EOD. I have seen a lot of such cases. True.

    We should stop mass-manufacturing engineers.
    That said, I shall leave. Drat! Microcontrollers paper tomorrow. 😛

  6. Monkey man says:

    You are the first to blogroll me as Dr. Spunky Monkey. You have no idea how happy that makes me.

    Having said that, I don’t abuse engineers, no. I am but a bitter guy with too much time on hands. That’s all really. And spewing invective is good time pass, I have discovered. I was merely addressing the issue of disparity of a glaring kind between the streams. I mean come on, we work 72 hour shifts at times, and giving us 1600 rupees a month for it does not have “Fair” written on it. Not even font size 2.

    “It reflects in conversation – we can convince you Halloween and Christmas are the same ‘coz oct31=dec25. We understand the universe and God in terms of operating systems. When someone switched from deathVocals to demureVoice, we said we were ‘amazed by the context-switch time’. The level of discomfort on a sleeper bus to Bangalore has to do with the passenger’s inertia. We try to analyze the ‘railway ticket booking and allotment algorithm’ while waiting in queues. And queues are where we crib about people not optimizing using queuing theory. It is not uncommon to hear of Rayleigh scattering being spoken of in context of us enjoying the sunset on the beach. And we are also the sort who commit very less to memory, for everything is available on the Net – it is commonplace to have a conversation like “Bridget Jones… what’s that guy’s name….” *wiki for ‘Bridget Jones film’* aha! Colin Firth… ” – so much that our idea of the ultimate terrorist attack would be to bomb the Google servers.”

    Oh god, you are a geek. Like *geek*. Said with a little shriek.
    (Ah, the poetry)

    I’d love to go on and write super long comment, but god I am tired.

  7. wanderlust says:

    @malaveeka:
    meaning?
    @siri:
    clowns??? mass manufacturing? you’ve misunderstood me, i guess, and just maybe it has to do with your exams. hope microcontrollers went well. and all the best for the rest.
    @monkey man:
    yeah… i guess abuse was too strong a term i used.

  8. Vikram says:

    I have only recently started reading your blog, I hope you dont mind me commenting. True, Engineering education is logical, systematic etc and that would imply that most engineers have those traits. But, for all their lack of logic and abundance of bilge, reporters have the power and courage (not all of them) to change society. Why do you think reporters go to the middle of Jharkhand to tell us how the mega corporations engineers will be enriching with ‘logic’ are poisoning the environment and destroying lives ? (http://www.anroav.org/content/view/26/5/) It is because, they have the courage and the conscience to give people a voice. At the end of the day, they have the power (if they use it correctly) to affect people’s lives more, much more than engineers do.

  9. wanderlust says:

    @Vikram:
    >>I hope you dont mind me commenting.
    of course not! i welcome well-written comments like yours.

    you’re right when you say they are courageous in ways we engineers might probably never get a chance to be. but when you say they have the power (if they use it correctly) to affect people’s lives more, much more than engineers do, you must realize that it’s quite a big IF.
    just take a look at what indians are being fed by the media today. biased coverage of the worst sort. the worst part is, the media is doing that of its own volition, not because they are being pressurised by politicians or anything like that.
    at the lowest level, a journalist risks life and limb to get copy… a few minutes more footage, another question, one more soundbyte.. all mean more TRPs; her immediate concern is hardly changing the world.
    that said, we need to admit that the media shapes the way we think. As to whether that is for better or for worse…………. every time i see a TV screen, the first thing that gets into my mind is 1984. reporting for TRPs wouldn’t entirely be a bad thing had it not been that the Indian public has been made to accept bilge as its only alternative.

    at another level, i’d say the media are not responsible for their prejudices (their naked veneration of anything to do with the West, their disdain for Indian culture… I can go on), but the people who design their syllabus in colleges are. Engineers on the other hand aren’t fed opinions about political biases or history… they grasp, learn and analyze for themselves, more so ‘coz this is timepass for them, not mugging material or stuff which their career depends on.

  10. wanderlust says:

    oh, and journos by definition are supposed to change the world by shaping its opinions. which at most times is a greater power than engineers can have.

  11. Vikram says:

    @wanderlust
    just take a look at what indians are being fed by the media today. biased coverage of the worst sort. the worst part is, the media is doing that of its own volition, not because they are being pressurised by politicians or anything like that.

    I concur. It almost seems to me like Doordarshan is the best source for daily news. Ethics seems to be an issue some times too, wikipedia has an archived discussion about how the Times of India copied one of its articles word to word, and did not even bother to give credit. I also remember that during new years time a group of 4 drunk kids ran over a BMC employee in Mumbai, killing themselves and him. ToI ran a front page story on this but had only one or two lines about the employee. The rest of the coverage seemed to be more about the kids, as ‘victims’.

    On the other hand, I do feel that most of the new Indian media is very secular (which to me is one of the core values of an Indian), it often highlights problems faced by minorities, students from the North East, and doesnt seem to be afraid of the bureaucracy.

    at another level, i’d say the media are not responsible for their prejudices …. but the people who design their syllabus in colleges are.

    Unfortunately, this is true for almost all Indians. As per my recollection, all my civics textbook ever taught me was what age somebody has to be to become PM, how many seats the Lok Sabha, Vidhan Sabha have etc etc … They never talked about what it meant to be an Indian citizen, modern India and the issues we face today as a society. The new NCERT textbooks address this to a good extent, so that gives some hope. Cheers.

  12. Arjun says:

    “On the other hand, I do feel that most of the new Indian media is very secular”

    🙂 kind of reminds you painfully of your point about right-wing media houses and the necessity for them, doesn’t it? Vikram here has made the most generous statement anyone has made about the Indian media in quite some time now. He has a kind heart.

  13. wanderlust says:

    @Vikram:
    w.r.t the first part of your comment, I think you should read this article by Khushwant Singh. It shows why and how print media has deteriorated to ToILet Paper level.
    http://www.outlookindia.com/full.asp?fodname=20080324&fname=Col+Khushwant+Singh+(F)&sid=1

    >>On the other hand, I do feel that most of the new Indian media is very secular
    Pseudosecular, more like. When was the last time you heard of the hindu side of any story? Why is Rahul Dravid asked to apologize just because he attended an RSS function? Why is the RSS branded communal? Why do they get bad press all the time inspite of their good activities, and why doesn’t SIMI get more bad press than it does, considering all the activities they are involved in?
    The media does nothing for the majority other than put them down, bring down their self esteem, and basically makes it uncool to identify oneself with anything Vedic. They are quick to brand anyone as much as wearing saffron as “fundamentalist”. there’s no pride left in being a hindu.
    This doesn’t qualify as secular.

    Unfortunately, the textbooks are only reaffirming this pseudosecular attitude. we are all told about the ills of Hinduism, whereas no such mention is made about other religions. We are blind to the brutalities of the Mughals. we venerate Gandhi and Nehru to the point of worship so much that the average student does not objectively analyze either person. We feel ashamed of following our traditions simply because they are “superstition”. for us, fed on a diet of textbooks and indian media, being modern means rejecting everything of our past.

    I took the liberty of googling for you (force of habit, please don’t mind it)… you don’t live in India, do you? that explains your take on the Indian media.

  14. Vikram says:

    Pseudosecular, more like. When was the last time you heard of the hindu side of any story? Why is Rahul Dravid asked to apologize just because he attended an RSS function? Why is the RSS branded communal? Why do they get bad press all the time inspite of their good activities, and why doesn’t SIMI get more bad press than it does, considering all the activities they are involved in?
    The media does nothing for the majority other than put them down, bring down their self esteem, and basically makes it uncool to identify oneself with anything Vedic. They are quick to brand anyone as much as wearing saffron as “fundamentalist”. there’s no pride left in being a hindu.
    This doesn’t qualify as secular.

    >>there’s no pride left in being a hindu

    If one was proud of being a Hindu, one would wear saffron without caring for any “fundamentalist” labels. Well, wanderlust, I just attended a talk by Shabnam Hashmi, the founder of ANGHAD, a person who works at the grassroots level. Her observation was that the RSS is pretty unequivocally communal. I will be all ears to your assessment of the RSS, after you do some work like her. You have every right to your opinion, but unless opinions are backed by work and research thats all they are. You may also want to watch this, http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3829364588351777769&q=Final+SOlution&total=1285&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=0 . Once again, if you have a link to a movie showing me how brilliant the RSS is, I will be all eyes and ears.

    I am sorry if this discussion became rather unpleasant, we seem to stand on opposite sides of the fence. I like your writing though.

  15. wanderlust says:

    >>If one was proud of being a Hindu, one would wear saffron without caring for any “fundamentalist” labels.
    right from kindergarten, we are taught that hinduism is ridden with superstition. we are taught that polytheism and idol worship are evils…. you have lessons about reformers who worked against idol worship, and that monotheism is superior. Our religion is criticized for being ridden with rites and rituals, so much that no kid ends up feeling proud of following those rites and rituals. How the hell can pride just well up in such a situation?

    I’m really sorry I’m not able to view the video, as my college blocks streaming video sites.
    But I’ll say this much – I don’t work at the grassroots level [except of course cleaning the beach with a million others], and hence my ‘research’ is limited to what I read on the Net. I wouldn’t discount these op-eds and news items they link to as sources of reliable information – imo, they are more reliable than the shite on cnn-ibn that shapes the opinions of millions.
    I would urge you to read this blog, especially this post, with an open mind for best results.
    It is initially hard to start looking at the world through a viewpoint hitherto frowned upon, and which goes against all that you’ve been believing in, but do give it a shot.

    I am inclined to not making debates personal. you needn’t worry about the discussion becoming rather unpleasant – i always try to separate the person from the opinion.

  16. Vikram says:

    These are some excerpts from Mr. Swamy’s article:

    @The identity of an “Indian” follows as an easy corollary as one who is a Hindu
    Not quite, the Constitution of India defines it as Union of States and gives Parliament the right to make citizenship laws. Citizenship in nation states is based on abiding by the nations laws, participating in its politics (and paying taxes) in return for access to national institutions and privileges. That is it. Bollywood style desh bhakti, Hinduism, Islam etc etc has nothing to do with it.

    @while Muslims have increased their share by about 3 percent

    Please see page 40 (pg 61 in Acrobat) of this report http://www.godgraces.org/files/Muslim%20Report.pdf , again prepared by a social scientist through proper research and work. Muslim fertility, though higher than average is declining at a similar rate.

    @If India is the one of the most corrupt countries today and purchasable, it is because the core Hindu values of simplicity, sacrifice and abstinence have been systematically downgraded over the years.

    This is actually not true, there are various metrics on corruptions out there. One is the Transparency International index, seen here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corruption_Perceptions_Index), India is ranked 72/179, much more importantly much higher than other countries at similar economic levels as India. Another metric is available on the World Bank website, it gives similar results with data starting from 1995. Islamic nations Tunisia (61), Jordan (51) and Egypt (105), Indonesia (143) are ranked both below and above India. So I am sure are X’ian, Buddhist etc. countries.

    @Non-Hindus can join this Hindustani unity, but first they must agree to adhere to the minimum requirement of recognizing and accepting that their cultural legacy is Hindu, and revere their Hindu origins

    India, gained independence due to the efforts of Gandhi, Nehru, Ambedkar etc., it was in their vision that India was created, we must first revere them along with our religions. Mr. Togadia and Mr. Swamy’s ‘forerunners’ did not do much for freeing our country as far as I know.

    Next time, you link a post to a blog please verify its claims.

    Thank You.

  17. wanderlust says:

    i didn’t mean the contents of mr. swamy’s article were the gospel truth. it’s just a different point of view you might not be accustomed to.

    >>India, gained independence due to the efforts of Gandhi, Nehru, Ambedkar etc
    not totally true. You seem to be a student in the US. Do you know about Ghadar started at UCB? Or the alternative theories about Subhas Bose’s death?
    We venerate gandhi and nehru only because we’ve been fed their version of history right from kindergarten, and because we see their faces on banknotes and coins, have holidays on their birthdays…. not completely because of any real contribution on their part. In that case, why don’t we have a holiday on Bose’s birthday? His Azad Hind Fauj was as instrumental if not more in gaining india her independence as Quit India “movement” [which fizzled out in two days, i think].
    >>we must first revere them along with our religions
    WHY??? why revere?
    I suggest you read Shashi Tharoor’s The Great Indian Novel for an alternative perspective on Nehru, Gandhi, Patel and Bose.
    I see no point in revering any politician. that makes you think them infallible, and obscures your mind from viewing them or their actions objectively.

    >>Mr. Togadia and Mr. Swamy’s ‘forerunners’ did not do much for freeing our country as far as I know
    I don’t suppose you have heard of Veer Savarkar who spent twelve years in the Andamans. Or of Bal Gangadhar Tilak who was imprisoned in Burma.
    But I don’t think your line about forerunners holds at all. I mean… every citizen has a claim to the resources of India, as well as the top post. By virtue of just being born on this soil. or accepting this land as your own and agreeing to abide by its laws and spirit. Not just because their ancestors or idealogical predecessors did something for the country. By that argument, you can say Rajmohan Gandhi and the rest of his cousins should claim the PM post. And the German Anita Pfaff-Bose [Subhas Bose had a daughter… how many of you knew that? All we know about is Nehru’s dynasty].
    Corollary, in a few years, Rahul Gandhi’s colombian girlfriend can claim the PM post – her ma-in-law did the same. We already have a KGB agent controlling the nation.. now we can look forward to a CIA agent.
    >>Next time, you link a post to a blog please verify its claims
    Nah… blogs are inherently supposed to be noisy, and about opinions, not necessarily facts. And going by that count, you wouldn’t be able to link up any blog [including this one], or even a news item – why, even a wiki entry.

  18. Vikram says:

    I think you are misinterpreting some of my statements. The basic objective of my post was to debase Mr. Swamy’s claims by providing counterclaims with appropriate references. Mr. Swamy pedalled a Hindu nationalist agenda (which he has every right to) but the data and facts he used to justify his agenda were either false or a distortion of facts.

    @ Why revere ?
    I didnt mean revere in the sense of politicians but their values as freedom fighters. How many times did Gandhi go to jail ? How many times did Lala Lajpatrai get beat by the police ? Quite a few. I never said that we revere their children etc and give them political power. My point was that we revere their values of tolerance, secularism, equality and unity. That is what makes one Indian, I think.

    @ We already have a KGB agent controlling the nation..
    Not quite, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7291477.stm

    @ blogs are inherently supposed to be noisy, and about opinions

    Opinions are welcome, but are more meaningful when backed up by solid facts.

    I would also like to know why the RSS thinks that we should know all about the brutalities of Aurangzeb’s rule (which I also think we should) but not know about the Gujarat riots (http://www.organiser.org/dynamic/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=228&page=30).

  19. wanderlust says:

    I’m really sorry to say this, but your fault-finding actually strikes one as nit-picking. and, you seem to attribute simply too much to the history-book figures to making us “free”. India is not just Nehru’s vision. She is an idea in play since thousands and thousands of years. You are one of those millions an example of the continued success of Macaulay and Nehru.
    while it’s all great to know people who had faith and conviction in making the nation free, you must understand that fervor and zeal for revolution and all that that got us our freedom does not necessarily translate to nation-builder post-independence. They are two completely different arenas.
    secularism… ahhh… don’t see the media honouring that.

    KGB agent… sorry… that was an in-reference. I found a convincing argument elsewhere that sonia gandhi is a kgb agent – considering her father was one, and she organized a rendezvous between italian secret service and R&AW when she was ‘just a housewife’ in the ’70s, that Russian ambassador was an important person who convinced Indira to accept her as her daughter in law…
    and heck, she accepts an award that places her under allegience to Belgium… someday I’ll write a mega-Sonia post…

    As for gujarat riots, do read my post on the same. I’m too tied up at the moment to look for the link I posted on the comments section which led to a site where it talked of the other perspective on the riots.

    I’m sure you don’t quite say “opinions are welcome but are more meaningful when backed up by solid facts” when you read cnn-ibn’s website, or the times of India.

    That apart, since we seem to have deviated considerably from the point of the post, I’ll be gladder if we could continue this debate elsewhere. you can use the contact form provided on the “how to contact wanderlust’ page.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s